Tag Archives: Mataatua

How to read this Blog

SEQUENCE:

In this blog I am reporting on six different journeys; Abel Tasman’s, the four Waka’s and my own. In my journey I travel to all the key locations present in the others. I tell each story, up to the point that they co-incide. Abel Tasman’s story is told sequentially, through his diary, but this is not always possible with the other journeys… there would simply be too much driving involved.

coinciding paths

The journeys of Abel Tasman and the people of the Kurahupo, to the point of their co-incidence.

Take Abel Tasman’s 18th December 1642 for example. He was in Golden Bay, inside Cape Farewell at the top of the South Island. On that day he met some Maori. They were descendants of the Kurahaupo, who had traveled from Tahiti, then Rarotonga and then to New Zealand. They had landed at the North Cape (northernmost point of the North Island), then sailed down to Mahia (mid way up the east coast of the North Island), then overland through Hastings, Taupo and down the Manawatu River. From there they had moved to the Marlborough sounds at the top of the South Island, and finally, west into Golden Bay.

I simply can’t travel to all the places in that journey AND follow Tasman’s path simultaneously; he is traveling north, they are going south. For me to visit the places in a sequence that explains the story well I would have to travel alternately between the far North and the South for each post. This blog is therefore, of necessity, not in the best order to build up the stories sequentially and have them coincide at a set day and location in Tasman’s journey. I can only do that in book form.

This blog is presented in the order that I visit the locations. I will do my best to get as close as possible to a comprehensible order, but on occasions I have to leave it to the reader to assemble the parts into their correct chronological sequence.

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The ‘categories’ selection bar.

THE ORDER OF THE POSTS:

Entries in this blog are normally presented ‘newest first’. This will work well for anyone following the blog regularly,but is not so good for someone joining the journeys part way through. To help new visitors, setting the post order to ‘Oldest first’ allows them to view the posts in the order that they were published; that is, ‘Oldest post first’. This panel appears at the very foot of the page.

 

categories

The ‘categories’ selection bar.

THE INDIVIDUAL STORIES:

Entries in this blog are organised into ‘categories’. There is a category for each journey. If you want to follow just a single journey, then clicking one of the category headings “Abel Tasman” “The Waka’s” or “My journal” will present you with only the posts relating to that track. The Category “The Waka’s” is further divided into four; Kurahaupo, Tainui, Mahuhu and Matawhaorua. Picking ‘All posts’ removes the filter, and shows everything. On desktop computers and laptops the categories are shown in full just above the main pictures. On mobile devices they are found by touching the bar marked ‘categories’.

 

category banners

Category banner for ‘Kurahaupo’ posts

In order to help the reader understand the relevant position of each post in the overall story-line, each post is headed with a banner indicating which journey it is a part of.

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Tasman’s journal, as it appears in this blog.

THE JOURNALS:

Abel Tasman left us a daily Journal, and I quote this in full before exploring the events of the day. His journal entries are presented like this.

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The Maori ‘diary’ as it appears in this blog.

Unfortunately, we have no equivalent daily record for the Maori/Polynesian travelers, so I have devised one. The daily ‘events’ of the Polynesian/Maori travelers are also presented in diary form. The detail of the diaries are a fiction, we simply don’t know precisely what happened every day, but the generality is correct, and it is presented wrapped in supposition based on our understanding of the Maori and Polynesian social forms. The Maori/Polynesian ‘diary’ looks like this.

categories

Words with a green background can be clicked to hear their pronunciation

NAMES, PLACES AND PRONUNCIATION.

Many of the words used are Maori and Old Dutch. To help you understand these correctly I have joined an audio track to important words, so that you can hear them pronounced correctly. Click on a word that has a green background to hear it spoken.

It works like this. Any text highlighted in green has a sound clip attached to it. For example if you wanted to hear how to pronounce , then you would just click on it.

CONTACT ME.

Please feel free to use the “Contact me” form or “comments” to ask about any particular aspect of any of the journeys. I will try and respond to your inquiries and address missing information or errors. The ‘Contact me’ form is found under the ‘About’ category. It also includes a map indication of where I am at the moment.

Six Boats: An Introduction

Video: Introduction to Six Boats Video posted by Six Boats on Thursday, April 30, 2015

I’d often heard people saying how wonderful these e-book reader things were, and I felt a bit silly that I hadn’t used one. So about a year ago I loaded an e-book reader onto my iPad and searched around for a free book to install. Scrolling through lists of books looking for something interesting, my attention was grabbed by a particular volume, which I downloaded, and dived straight into. I had come across James Cook’s journal of his first voyage across the Pacific. In no time at all I was transported to 1769 and shared his daily experience of his landing in New Zealand, progress around its coastline, and his meetings with the local people; the Maori.

On that visit, James Cook circumnavigated both the North and South Islands… and an idea began to form. Wouldn’t it be interesting to follow his journey, going to the all places he did, except doing it from the land?

The idea began to take hold. I started to think about the practicalities of doing it; where would I need to get to? what type of vehicle would I need? … and I started to think about writing it up as a book as I went.

Studying Cook’s journal further it became obvious that he already knew of the existence of New Zealand. He was not only aware that Abel Tasman had visited it (indeed, he had named it), but he quite clearly had a copy, not only of Tasman’s chart (I didn’t know any such existed), but also of his journal (this was also news to me). I soon realised that any book about Cook’s ‘discovery’ of New Zealand would also need to include a section about Abel Tasman, and I began researching his journal. I soon found an English translation of the journal, and also a copy of his chart…

Abel Tasman's chart of New Zealand

The chart of New Zealand included in the Hague copy of Abel Tasman’s journal.

I became absorbed by Tasman’s voyage, and as I read further into it I found that I was increasingly picturing his voyage, not just from the landward position, but also from the viewpoint of the people occupying that land.

Tasman's journal for the day Dec 13th 1642.

Tasman’s journal page for the day Dec 13th 1642.

Abel Tasman saw the West Coast of New Zealand, 13th December 1642, around halfway up the South Island. From there he followed the coast to its northern extremity, and then departed, sailing onward to discover Fiji and Tonga. As he passed, he was seen by, and had encounters with, the local Maori population… but these people too, like Tasman, were not ‘native’… they were immigrants. So what was their story? Where had they come from? And how had they come to be in the place where they could see him go past?

Abel Tasman discovered New Zealand, for the Europeans, in 1642. However, the Polynesians had discovered it at least seven centuries earlier, and had settled the country in a wave of deliberate migration around the 1300’s. The stories of the journeys of these Polynesians was just as compelling as the journey of Tasman, and as I began to plan a trip along Abel Tasman’s path, I realised that I should also understand how the populations that could have seen him go past had come to be there… and that was the seed of this blog.

I am going on a journey. I am going to follow Abel Tasman’s voyage, day by day, through his journal and his chart; except I am going to follow him from the landward position.

Shoot locations

Places I am going to visit. Abel Tasman’s course is in light blue. The movements of the Kurahaupo people is in purple, Tainui in green, Mahuhu in ochre, and Matawhaorua in red.

As I travel to the places and features that he reports, I am going to also tell the stories of the people that could have observed him… their journeys over ocean and land, from their Polynesian origins, to the places from which that they could have seen him pass.

Abel Tasman had two ships, the Heemskerck and the Zeehaen. All of the Maori that could have seen Tasman pass, could trace their origins back to just four Polynesian voyaging vessels; the Kurahaupo, the Tainui, the Mataatua and the Matawhaorua. These are the Six Boats of the title of this blog.

This blog is the journal of my journey as I follow the movements of these six boats, their occupants and descendants, to the places that their journeys coincide.