How to read this Blog

SEQUENCE:

In this blog I am reporting on six different journeys; Abel Tasman’s, the four Waka’s and my own. In my journey I travel to all the key locations present in the others. I tell each story, up to the point that they co-incide. Abel Tasman’s story is told sequentially, through his diary, but this is not always possible with the other journeys… there would simply be too much driving involved.

coinciding paths

The journeys of Abel Tasman and the people of the Kurahupo, to the point of their co-incidence.

Take Abel Tasman’s 18th December 1642 for example. He was in Golden Bay, inside Cape Farewell at the top of the South Island. On that day he met some Maori. They were descendants of the Kurahaupo, who had traveled from Tahiti, then Rarotonga and then to New Zealand. They had landed at the North Cape (northernmost point of the North Island), then sailed down to Mahia (mid way up the east coast of the North Island), then overland through Hastings, Taupo and down the Manawatu River. From there they had moved to the Marlborough sounds at the top of the South Island, and finally, west into Golden Bay.

I simply can’t travel to all the places in that journey AND follow Tasman’s path simultaneously; he is traveling north, they are going south. For me to visit the places in a sequence that explains the story well I would have to travel alternately between the far North and the South for each post. This blog is therefore, of necessity, not in the best order to build up the stories sequentially and have them coincide at a set day and location in Tasman’s journey. I can only do that in book form.

This blog is presented in the order that I visit the locations. I will do my best to get as close as possible to a comprehensible order, but on occasions I have to leave it to the reader to assemble the parts into their correct chronological sequence.

categories

The ‘categories’ selection bar.

THE ORDER OF THE POSTS:

Entries in this blog are normally presented ‘newest first’. This will work well for anyone following the blog regularly,but is not so good for someone joining the journeys part way through. To help new visitors, setting the post order to ‘Oldest first’ allows them to view the posts in the order that they were published; that is, ‘Oldest post first’. This panel appears at the very foot of the page.

 

categories

The ‘categories’ selection bar.

THE INDIVIDUAL STORIES:

Entries in this blog are organised into ‘categories’. There is a category for each journey. If you want to follow just a single journey, then clicking one of the category headings “Abel Tasman” “The Waka’s” or “My journal” will present you with only the posts relating to that track. The Category “The Waka’s” is further divided into four; Kurahaupo, Tainui, Mahuhu and Matawhaorua. Picking ‘All posts’ removes the filter, and shows everything. On desktop computers and laptops the categories are shown in full just above the main pictures. On mobile devices they are found by touching the bar marked ‘categories’.

 

category banners

Category banner for ‘Kurahaupo’ posts

In order to help the reader understand the relevant position of each post in the overall story-line, each post is headed with a banner indicating which journey it is a part of.

categories

Tasman’s journal, as it appears in this blog.

THE JOURNALS:

Abel Tasman left us a daily Journal, and I quote this in full before exploring the events of the day. His journal entries are presented like this.

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The Maori ‘diary’ as it appears in this blog.

Unfortunately, we have no equivalent daily record for the Maori/Polynesian travelers, so I have devised one. The daily ‘events’ of the Polynesian/Maori travelers are also presented in diary form. The detail of the diaries are a fiction, we simply don’t know precisely what happened every day, but the generality is correct, and it is presented wrapped in supposition based on our understanding of the Maori and Polynesian social forms. The Maori/Polynesian ‘diary’ looks like this.

categories

Words with a green background can be clicked to hear their pronunciation

NAMES, PLACES AND PRONUNCIATION.

Many of the words used are Maori and Old Dutch. To help you understand these correctly I have joined an audio track to important words, so that you can hear them pronounced correctly. Click on a word that has a green background to hear it spoken.

It works like this. Any text highlighted in green has a sound clip attached to it. For example if you wanted to hear how to pronounce , then you would just click on it.

CONTACT ME.

Please feel free to use the “Contact me” form or “comments” to ask about any particular aspect of any of the journeys. I will try and respond to your inquiries and address missing information or errors. The ‘Contact me’ form is found under the ‘About’ category. It also includes a map indication of where I am at the moment.

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